WHAT IS 1787?

1787 is a new American political party.

When an organization “nominates qualified candidates for president and various congressional offices in numerous states” as 1787 will, the U.S. Federal Election Commission (FEC) automatically classifies it as a national party committee.  But that is where the “political party” distinction ends.

In his farewell address to the nation, President George Washington praised our system’s ability to represent individual differences.  But, even way back then, he identified political parties as a specific threat to our union: “One of the expedients of party to acquire influence within particular districts is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts. You cannot shield yourselves too much against the jealousies and heartburnings which spring from these misrepresentations.”  He further warned that parties “serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party.”

 
Washington went on to say that, if these factions are tolerated, “cunning, ambitious and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp for themselves the reins of government.”  George’s prediction proved 1000% correct. This is exactly what has happened.

 

1787 is a new and improved brand of leadership that will never, as George Washington warned, “serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party.”  In fact, with 1787 it’s virtually impossible for the will of the party to overshadow the will of the people because 1787 members are in complete control of its direction. Think of 1787 like a democracy within the U.S. democracy, where every outcome is a majority rule of the members.  Read more on the 1787 rules & procedures here.


You can also think of 1787 as a modern-day Constitutional Convention, where committed citizens engage in respectful, nonpartisan conversation not to change the U.S. Constitution in any way, but to enhance and strengthen the extraordinary freedoms that our country was founded on.

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